Anjala Movie Review

Anjala Movie Review
Anjala Movie Review

Writer & Directer : Thangam Saravanan
Producer : Dhilip Subbarayan
Cast : Vimal | Nandita | Pasupathy
Music : Gopi Sunder
Cinematography : Ravi Kannan
Editer : Praveen K. L.
Production company : Farmer’s Master Plan Production | 1st Copy Pictures
Distribution : Auraa Cinemas
Running Time : 112 mins

There happens to be something more intriguing with ‘Anjala’ and it’s none other than Tea shop. Sometimes, it has played an important character in our everyday lives, especially for the ones across the villages and towns, where tea shops happen to be the meeting place and discussion of so many issues and topics. Moreover, in certain places, tea stalls have become the root cause for the origin of many towns and villages. Anjala too travels on the same concept. The film is directed by Thangam Saravanan and is produced by Dhilip Subbarayan with Vimal, Nandita and Pasupathy in lead roles.

Set against the backdrops of a small town, Anjala Tea stall is owned by Pasupathy, who has a history to tell about the origin. Dating back to pre-independence era, his grandfather (Pasupathy again) had a reason to help the passerby ones with some refreshing drinks travelling through the desert land. Gradually, this had prompted the scenario with a little roofed refreshment centre turning into a small town indeed. At the moment, Anjala Tea stall has become the favourite place for meeting of friends including Vimal and it has some sentimental connection with many people too. However, the problem strikes through an issue, where the tea stall has to shut down for instructions from Government.

There are certain things that really deserve appreciation. First and foremost, it’s casting of actors. Vimal, Pasupathy and Nandita are someone who would naturally fit to any roles that are offered to them, especially the ones laced with realistic ones. This indeed becomes the close to heart attraction. The story is simple and convincing. But the slightest problem comes through the screenplay, where there is lack of drama, especially in the second half. It’s a difficult thing to handle a script that is set in the same backdrop; the drama should have been more engaging. We get tired of the characters over and again repeating the same dramatic events. The dialogues could have been done finely. But the flashback sequences of Pasupathy are done excellently done. Musical score by Gopi Sunder is average, but doesn’t get adhered to the script here.

On the whole, Anjala will be having decent reception among audiences from rural backdrops, but the ones at multiplex screens might opt this show based on the word of mouth.