Yaman Movie Review

Yaman Movie Review

Directed by : Jeeva Shankar
Written by :Jeeva Shankar
Producer : A. Subaskaran, Fatima Vijay Antony
Cast : Vijay Antony, Miya George, Thiagarajan
Music : Vijay Antony
Editor : Veera Senthil Raj
Cinematographer : Jeeva Shankar
Production company : Lyca Productions, Vijay Antony Film Corporation
Running time : 153 mins

A routine political drama that traverses through the life of a youngster, who by chance bumps into strangers, who later turn into acquaintances followed by foes – That’s a simple and single line plot of Yaman, which comes from the successful combination of Naan. Having debuted a unique psychological thriller, Jeeva Shankar and Vijay Antony show up with this political drama titled ‘Yaman’, which has prominent actors like Miya George, Thiyagarajan, Sangili Murugan, Marimuthu, Charlie, Prinz Nithik and Swaminathan.

Having lost his parents within few days of birthday, Vijay Antony grows up being pampered by his grandfather (Sangili Murugan). When he is diagnosed with some severe disease, Vijay Antony seeks desperate need for money and that’s when he bumps into Swaminathan, who arranges him money, but in turn Vijay Antony has to take up fake charge of getting imprisoned for a hit and run case. What follows next is a series of a twists and turns into the tale, where Vijay Antony comes across numerous characters that lets him get into world of politics. But it isn’t just about his political embarkation, but a way hidden out of the mysterious death of his father (again played by Vijay Antony).

One thing is sure about this film and every audience would definitely accept this fact too. Had the film avoided the slow motion, the actual running length of this film would have been just 90 minutes. We find most of the sequences involving the depiction of Vijay Antony in mass heroism mode made use of such techniques, which starts creating an aversion after certain point of time. In the same manner, the plot hardly has a substantial narration, where there are too many loose ends with a predictable storyline. The running length is too over stretched up and we don’t find it engaging in many parts.

Vijay Antony seems to have developed an inherent belief that such mannerisms of keeping a silent killer look would enhance his screen presence. But he has come out of such paradigms and attempt something different or else audience would get bored. Miya George has been completely wasted out here and her role looks vague. Thiyagarajan performs with more depth in his role and it looks like a RGV inspired baddie character for Jeeva Shankar. Actor Arul playing the role of Thanga Pandian makes a stupendous job. Charlie has done a tremendous job and he gets a meaty role to play after a long time. Prinz Nithik of Naan Sigappu Manithan fame comes up with a miniscule yet appealing acting.

Songs turn out to be a major speed breaker in hampering the screenplay. Dialogues are pretty appreciable and Jeeva Shankar as cinematographer has done a remarkable job.